Your BMI Sucks!

The body mass index, or BMI, is commonly used in doctors’ offices or in general fitness terms as a way to estimate your body fat level. It provides a quick and easy way to evaluate obesity trends in the general population. Medical professionals use it as one of many screening tools, such as cholesterol checks and family history questionnaires, to evaluate your risk of chronic disease related to your weight. But your doctor cannot rely on BMI alone for diagnosis of whether you’re overweight or obese and the health risks posed by these conditions.

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Your BMI is equal to your weight in kilograms divided by your height in meters squared. The equation using American measurements is: BMI = weight(kg) / (height x height (m)). For many online calculators, you enter your weight and height, and the calculations are done for you.

BMI is useful as a way to evaluate the rate of being overweight or obese in the general population. It’s easy, convenient and inexpensive, and doesn’t require any specific training to take the measurements. But BMI only provides a rough estimation of your body fat because it doesn’t involve any direct measures of your tissue.

Limitations:

BMI Mistakes Muscle for Fat

BMI uses your weight in the formula but doesn’t distinguish if that weight comes from an abundance of fat or from lean tissue. Athletes and gym enthusiasts who carry a great deal of muscle may seem heavy for their height or overall size, but that’s because muscle is denser than fat. These highly muscular folk may have a high BMI but not have too much fat.

Individuals who are very muscular such as bodybuilders or those that have very little muscle definition may not receive an accurate BMI reading by using height and weight measurements alone. Muscle weighs more than fat. Hence a muscular person may appear to have a higher BMI and be perfectly healthy, or a frail, inactive person may appear to have a lower BMI and in reality have more body fat than is healthy.

Your health care provider can easily see with a physical evaluation and lifestyle questions that your high BMI is due to muscularity rather than fat. Further evaluations, such as blood pressure checks and cholesterol screenings, may still be performed to rule out any underlying health issues.

BMI Can Underestimate Fat

Because BMI does not directly measure fat, it can miscategorize people as healthy who have a normal weight for their height, when they’re actually carrying too much fatty tissue. A man with 20 percent or higher fat and a woman with 30 percent or higher, but both at normal weight, can be at the same risk of chronic disease as a person who looks obviously overweight.

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Sedentary people and older adults are at particular risk of this condition, called normal-weight obesity. If you don’t exercise, you lose valuable muscle mass and accumulate excess fat — even if you don’t rank high on height-weight charts. Older adults naturally lose muscle mass as they age, along with some bone density. For this reason, health providers often run lifestyle screenings, family history questionnaires and annual blood tests in addition to BMI calculations on all patients. This helps rule out normal-weight obesity in otherwise seemingly healthy patients.

A normal BMI is only one factor in your overall picture of health. If you smoke, eat a nutritionally poor diet that contains a lot of sugar and saturated fat, or sit the majority of your day, you may still be at risk of health problems.

BMI May Not Reflect Positive Change

BMI is a broad number that doesn’t accurately reflect changes in behavior, which could be improving your health. People with a high BMI who are physically active are at lower risk for many health problems than people with a high BMI who are sedentary. For example, physical activity correlates with reduced risk of coronary heart disease and early death, regardless of your weight.

People who adopt a healthier lifestyle by exercising more and choosing healthier foods over junk food may not lose weight if they haven’t reduced their calories significantly. They are healthier, but BMI doesn’t change because their weight has remained stable. If they rely on BMI as the only marker of their health, their new habits don’t seem to be doing much good.

Even if you lose weight, your BMI may not change noticeably. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that losing 5 to 10 percent of your weight can lead to positive benefits, such as decreased blood pressure and cholesterol. In a 200-pound person, this is a loss of 10 to 20 pounds. Losing the weight may not move your BMI to a normal range, however. For example, a 5-foot-11-inch person must weigh between 136 and 178 pounds to register a normal BMI. If he started out at 200 pounds and lost 10 to 20 pounds, he may have improved his health, but he still falls into an overweight BMI range. Although a bit frustrating, the change still has positive benefits.

Weight Distribution and BMI

Healthier habits often also change the distribution of your weight, even if weight loss isn’t showing up on the scale. You may lose some visceral — or belly — fat, which is inflammatory and increases your risk of disease. Exercise in particular helps you lose this fat. BMI can’t tell that you’ve reduced a wide waist circumference and added muscle, creating a healthier body composition. It may just show an unchanged ratio of height and weight, putting you in an overweight category.

Your waist size may be a better marker of your health status because it indicates where you store fat. Use a measuring tape to measure around your waist just below your belly button. A waist wider than 40 inches on a man or 35 inches on a woman can be dangerous.

Those who have enough lean mass to be classified as obese by BMI but not by body fat percentage, are far and few in society. These persons would normally be highly active athletes, and it is unlikely sedentary persons or those with infrequent exercise habits would fall into this category.

Does not consider Age, Gender and Other Conditions

BMI fails to take age and sex into account. Women naturally tend to have more body fat than men of equal BMI, while older people tend to have more body fat than younger people with the same BMI.

Furthermore, BMI measurements have no way of measuring where body fat is located in the body. Studies have indicated that belly fat – the fat surrounding abdominal organs – is more dangerous than peripheral fat beneath the skin in other body areas.

If you are normal weight or overweight according to BMI (18.5-29.9) there is still a chance you are actually obese, which is primarily due to low levels of lean mass (muscle, water and glycogen).

BMI also does not account for lactating or pregnant women, children and teenagers who have not reached physical maturity and are still growing, and a tendency for natural differences in height and weight ratios between races.

Conclusion

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute suggests that an assessment of weight and health risks involves using three key measures

  • BMI
  • Waist circumference
  • Risk factors for diseases and conditions associated with obesity.

As BMI is based on weight and height measurements, by losing weight you will reduce your BMI and put yourself into a lower risk group. A healthy diet, including a balance of food groups, vitamins and minerals, is essential for a long and active life. Body weight and shape are a balance of energy intake (dietary calorific content) against output (calorific burn from activity and exercise).

Many studies have shown that, to lose weight slowly and steadily, any diet that includes a healthy balance will work if you are motivated. Ideally, a balanced eating plan is always best to lose weight healthily.

Simply put, BMI can give you a rough idea of your level of health when considered along with your lifestyle and physical factors. Sedentary lifestyle with an unhealthy diet and belly fat all point towards the risks that your BMI indicates. However, if you’re the opposite of the above factors, BMI may not be a criteria doing justice to your overall health.

Until next time,

The Travellothoner.

Feeling More Confident In The Gym

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For many people the idea of going to the gym is terrifying. We’re unhappy with our bodies, we know our fitness levels aren’t what they should be, and we worry about what other people might think. And it’s just discouraging to run or lift next to a super fit gym bunny, who makes us feel worse than we already do and so we just don’t go.

Of course, there are other ways to work out, (Check it here Workout For Those Who Hate Working Out! ) and you certainly don’t have to go to the gym. But, it is an effective way to get fit and lose weight. At the gym, there are trainers and experts to help and offer advice. There are cardio machines and weights to target every area of your body, and classes to help you get the most out of your sessions. It’s the perfect place for a full body workout and the perfect atmosphere to stay motivated. So, if you would love to hit the gym feeling confident and ready to sweat, here are some tips to help you.

Go Shopping

What you wear to the gym is down to you, there’s certainly no uniform. Some people prefer to work out in leggings and a baggy t-shirt. Others like to go all out with the professional activewear. Something from Nike, UnderArmour, etc. could give you a brilliant confidence boost and help you to make the gym more fun. Think about what makes you comfortable and treat yourself to some new items.

Although it won’t affect your performance directly, like any other day, dressing up for an occasion does give you a certain level of confidence which can go a long way. Like it is said “Don’t dress for the occasion. Dress to be the man you want to be”.

Pick Your Time

Some gyms offer beginner sessions or specific quiet times for more nervous users. If yours doesn’t, just ask when it’s quieter. Start by going in when it’s quiet and then branch out when you become more comfortable.

Early mornings or evening is when your gym may be most crowded, causing you to wait (which I hate more than anything) and break rhythm. Which is why I personally prefer going at slightly more off timings.

Take a Look Around

Start going in more and you’ll soon notice that there isn’t a “gym person.” You’ll see older people, younger people, large and small; there’ll be people from all walks of life exercising next to each other. Some will be very fit and healthy whereas others will be taking a stroll on the treadmill. Take a good look at everyone around you, and you’ll soon start to feel more confident.

Find the physique that you want for yourself, and track the respective persons workout patterns and preferences. Looking at others can be just as good a teacher as getting a trainer.

Ask for a Trainer

Most gyms offer a personal trainer service, sometimes this is even included in your membership price, and it’s definitely a brilliant idea for beginners. Even if it’s just one session, it’ll mean that there is someone to show you around and teach you how to use everything. They’ll also give you some advice about what you can do and how to push yourself. This will help you to feel like you know what you are doing and give you some focus moving forward.

If a trainer isn’t an option at least make sure, you have a thorough induction and ask any questions that you might have.

Keep Going

The best way to feel more confident and comfortable with anything is experience. Stick to a regular gym schedule, try classes and use as many of the machines as you can, and you’ll soon feel more at home. Slowly, you can phase out to non-machine workouts to gain raw strength, and that’s just awesome!

Regards,

The Travellothoner.

Note – Featured Image Courtesy : https://gedgetsworld.in/best-treadmill-in-india/

My Third Full Marathon – TMM 2019

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20th January, 2019 was the big day for me. All those days of waking up before the sun while my bed was at its comfortable best, getting myself mentally prepared to run while I struggled to get my stride in order and through all that constant soreness, muscle pains and what not!

It was going to be a tough day. One I was mentally prepared for; however it actually turned out to be tougher than I anticipated. Running the race for the 3rd time this year, I thought I had a slight edge over some others thanks to my experience. But the weather gods had something totally different in mind.

I did anticipate the first 5-7k to be really hot and humid, thanks to the thousands of people together, as well as it being very humid towards Nariman Point. However, slowly as the crowds begin to separate, the more seasoned runners pulling ahead, it starts to get better, with more breathing space (literally) for everybody. And usually, you start to feel the cool air whisking through your face as you near Haji Ali.

However this year, it was way worse. I was sweating so profusely by 10k, that I already felt slightly light headed. And what good weather usually starts hitting you by 9k, only came to us around 15-16k when we hit the Sea Link. To give you a better idea of how bad it was, I shall type an excerpt from The Times Of India, dated 21st January which goes as follows:

A sweltering Sunday meant that nearly 40% more marathoners needed medical attention compared to last year: By noon, over 3,200 were treated at the event’s medical camps for dehydration, exhaustion and muscle cramps. Fourteen needed hospitaliztion, though barring two, the majority went home by evening. Because of heat and humidity, several seasoned runners said they took more than their expected time to reach the finish line: Many who wanted to beat their personal best were disappointed as their running time increased by 25-45 mins.

In the morning, the minimum temperature recorded by IMD’s Colaba observatory was 20.3 degree Celsius, 1.4 degrees above normal. The maximum temperature was 33.6 degrees, which was 4.1 degrees above normal. Adding to the unconducive weather was a humidity level of 93%. Studies have shown that elite athletes can suffer one to four-minute slowdowns due to higher temperatures and humidity.

This year cases of cramps and dehydration were more mainly due to warm and humid weather. Also, the number of hospitalizations were more than last year’, said Dr. Vijay D’Silva, director, critical care and medical affairs, Asian Heart Institute (AHI). As compared to the 2,324 runners who required medical attention last year, the number rose to 3,226 this year. As a point of reference, overall participation rose by a little over 200 this year.

Read the entire article at:
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/67616609.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

It was a tough game mentally. I was running at a very good pace for the first 25k, covering that distance in just a little less than 3 hours. Then slowly as I felt a cramp start to build up, I had to slow down, and even walk in the midst cause I had another 17k to go, which would be just under the sun. And if that wasn’t enough, I felt morally depressed as I saw all the various pacers run past me.

Such is life. From a high of wanting to finish the race in 5:15 hours to wanting to quit at multiple durations, cause the cramps were getting to me. However, I knew this would be a blip on my running career, I’d never be able to forget. And giving up has always been something that’s very hard for me to accept on all levels. So I carried on, one step at a time, running slightly and walking all the more, doing my best to block all the pain that came with it. All is well that ends well I suppose.

Another thing I’d like to add at this point is, being well prepared for it, I don’t hate running as much as I did last time. I started my training keeping in mind this race a year ago, after finishing it in 2018. Last year, I did not take up running for almost a couple of months thanks to all the anguish and pain it caused. This time around, thanks to better conditioning, I’ve been on my feet on the day of the marathon and the next day (today); and I am looking forward to starting training again by the end of this week.

And like always, I did manage to run for the last 1.5k, just so that I could get this race over with. The timing was nowhere close to my liking, way past it. But it was a humbling experience and something that is going to surely help me grow as an individual and a runner. Looking forward to sharing many such experiences in the future.

-The Travellothoner.

Benefits of a body-weight workout

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Bodyweight training is as simple as it gets and requires no equipment in order to perform it.

1. It’s a super-efficient workout.

Research suggests high-output, bodyweight-based exercises like plyometrics yield awesome fitness gains in short durations. Since there’s no equipment involved, bodyweight workouts make it easy to transition from one move to the next with little rest. And you’ve probably already heard that those short-but-intense HIIT workouts can yield major results.

2. It can combine cardio and strength training

Performing quick cardio sessions (such as 60 seconds of burpees or high-knees) between strength movements (such as a set of push-ups or lunges) will keep the heart pumping while still encouraging muscle and strength development.

3. You can burn fat—fast.

Just a few minutes of a bodyweight circuit training can have a major impact on the body’s metabolism. If you’ve ever heard of the afterburn effect, you know that even when your workout is over, your body can still be revved for hours to come.

4. At any fitness level, it’s challenging.

Bodyweight exercises are great because they’re easily modified to challenge anyone. Adding extra reps, performing the exercises faster or super slowly, taking shorter breaks, or adding a ballistic movement (like a clap at the top of each push-up) are just a few ways to make the simplest workout tougher. And with each added modification, your progress is obvious.

5. You’ll gain core strength.

Your core is more than just six-pack abs. In fact, at least twenty-nine muscles make up the trunk of the body, and many simple bodyweight movements can be used to engage all of them. Such exercises won’t just give you tighter abs, you’ll also gain better posture, relieve lower back stress, and improve overall performance.

6. It can increase your flexibility.

Not everyone who does regular resistance training has to end up with tight muscles and inflexible joints. Bodyweight training can go hand-in-hand with building strength and flexibility. Completing bodyweight exercises through a full range of motion ensures your joints are moving freely. Plus, it can lead to improved posture and might reduce the chance of exercise-related injury.  Yoga, the fave no-equipment workout for many, is another great way to to improve flexibility while also significantly improving strength.

7. There’s never an excuse to not workout.

Ask someone why they don’t exercise, and chances are they have “no time” or it’s “inconvenient.” Luckily bodyweight exercises eliminate those common obstacles. When you only need a little space, it’s easy to squeeze in workouts wherever you are. Exercising without equipment can also be used as a stress reliever whether you’re working at home or on the road.

8. You’ll achieve better balance.

When it comes to this type of training, sometimes increasing resistance means increasing balance, too. For example, a normal squat can be ramped up by swapping in a single-leg squat (a.k.a. a pistol squat). Functional movements like that one can improve balance through increased body awareness and control.

9. You’ll never get bored.

It can be easy to get stuck in a workout rut of treadmills, bicep curls, lat pull-downs, and bench presses. That’s why bodyweight training can be so refreshing: There are countless exercise variations that can spice up any workout routine. Working with a variety of exercises not only relieves boredom, it can also help break plateaus and spark further progress.

10. Mixing up your workout is easy.

11. It’s free.

Gym memberships and boutique classes can quickly add up—but bodyweight training is free. Experts cite the low cost of bodyweight training as key to its rise in popularity.

12. It can help with injury prevention.

Injury is one of the main reasons people stop working out, so preventing those aches and pains should be a big priority. Bodyweight exercises are generally safe for any exerciser regardless of experience, age, or fitness level. Many simple bodyweight movements can actually be an effective option for rehabilitation, even for those with significant impairments.

13. You’ll see results.

Bodyweight exercises get results partly because they involve compound movements—meaning numerous joints and muscles are engaged in each move. Compound exercises such as push-ups and lunges have been shown to be extremely effective for strength gains and performance improvements. And research shows improved core strength (see No. 5 above) translates to improved strength gains throughout the entire body.

My road to 26.2 Miles – Weeks 5 and 6

This is a string of posts that I have been doing over the last 6 weeks to document my way through training for a full marathon.

You can follow them here :

  1. My road to 26.2 miles – Week 1
  2. My Road to 26.2 Miles – Week 2
  3. My road to 26.2 Miles – Weeks 3 and 4

My goal through these 6 weeks has been to intensify my training regime and improve my diet, so as to get leaner and tighter while maintaining my muscle mass. So far, it hasn’t been the most successful road. Although I have managed to lose a few kilos, I’m still far away from my goal. In the meantime, I also planned to increase my weekly running mileage which hasn’t been going as well as planned either.

However, on the bright side, I have managed to improve my training regime to include almost 2 hours of workout or active time in a day, which includes a session of running and a session of weight training. Over the last 2 weeks, I have managed to clock about 35kms a week, which includes more inclines. And during my weight training sessions, I have started increasing my number of reps per set while maintaining the same level of weights.

My prime focus still has been on getting an adequate amount of sleep and focusing on recovery, while making sure I consume foods with ample vitamins, nutrients and most importantly protein.

My goal over week 7 is to clock atleast 45-50 kms which includes a long run of atleast 2 hours or 20kms. Over the next few weeks until the marathon, I have also decided to reduce my weight training to give my body more time for recovery. All in all, Core-Training is an area that I am going to emphasize a lot more on.

Do feel free to add tips or share your expertise in the comments below, especially if you feel I am not on the right path.

Until next time,

The Travellothoner.

From 300lbs to 30 Muscle-Ups for time

As you guys are aware, writing on a topic involves having great knowledge on the subject which comes from regular reading and updation on the topics; and one of my favourite and regular pages to do this is The Crossfit Journal and their instagram page. And today I came across their ig post on Jared Enderton, A Crossfit Games Rookie, who basically was like any of us, and now competes for the title of “Fittest On Earth”.

I shall post the article below, and attach a link too. I own no rights to the article, and have no contributions in its construction. I am merely sharing it here for everyone to read.

Link : https://games.crossfit.com/article/300-pounds-30-muscle-ups-time

The night before the 2018 Reebok CrossFit Games began, Jared Enderton posted to Instagram.

“If I can do it, so can you.”

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Above were side-by-side photos of the 29-year-old Games rookie. One featured a grinning, flexing Games athlete in uniform; the other, an impassive young man with a belly.

“Ten years ago I weighed 300 lb., and tomorrow I’ll be one of 40 men competing for the title of Fittest on Earth at the CrossFit Games,” he wrote.

Football, baseball, golf, track—Enderton had always been an athlete. In high school, he was an All-American wrestler and Iowa’s 2007 undefeated state wrestling champion at a body weight of 189 lb. Then he took up strongman.

“The more weight you gain, the stronger you’re gonna get,” he thought.

So he ate.

At first, it was all in the name of sport—a lot of protein, a lot of carbs, a lot of gains.

“And then at a certain point, it really wasn’t even about that,” he said. “It was just like, I’m just eating everything I can to eat everything I can.”

Cake, pasta, cookies—nothing was off-limits. It wasn’t unusual for Enderton to devour a half a gallon of ice cream—cookies and cream was his favorite—in one sitting. By the start of his freshman year of college in 2010, he’d gained more than 100 lb. and lost his sense of self.

“I’ve always viewed myself as being a little bit athletic, but once you’re that heavy, you lose some of your identity, too; you kind of lose that belief in yourself,” he said. “I didn’t feel like the same athlete, and I wasn’t happy.”

Though he could certainly lift heavy shit—he was a nationally ranked strongman competitor—he could do little else. No more track, no more pick-up football games.

“Even thinking about those things I’m out of breath,” he said of his 300-lb. self.

He had trouble finding clothes that fit and lacked confidence speaking to women. Every glance at the mirror poked holes in his self-esteem, and the anxiety was a wake-up call.

“I’m like, ‘Whoa. … You need to do something to feel better about yourself.”

So, he cut the ice cream and ditched strongman for weightlifting. By 2014, he was a nationally ranked weightlifter competing at a body weight of around 185 lb.

In 2015, Enderton started CrossFit and further cleaned up his diet, adding more vegetables and tracking volume and macronutrients. He went on to take 22nd and 12th at the 2016 and 2017 South Regionals before qualifying for the Games this year with a fifth-place Regional finish.

The rewards of a healthy lifestyle aren’t limited to the leaderboard.

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“When I eat a healthy meal and it’s got protein and some carbs and a little bit of fat, I feel good, and a lot of times, after I’d eat all those binge meals I would feel horrible; I’d feel bad about myself.”

On Wednesday, Enderton—who currently weighs 195 lb. at 5 foot 6—made his CrossFit Games debut with an 22nd-place finish in Crit, 10 laps of a 1,200-m cycling course. Not long after, he opened 30 Muscle-ups with an unbroken set of 13 reps before racking up 1,230 lb. in CrossFit Total for a tie for fifth in that event.

That doesn’t mean the struggle is over.

“I still have some body-image issues,” he said. “It’s not like I made the Games and everything’s gone. … And I’m OK with that. It’s never a finished journey.”

Still, it’s a hell of a lot easier to pick out clothes now, he said.

“They mixed up my shorts with somebody else’s at the check-in,” Enderton said, noting that instead of the medium and large shorts he requested, he was given smalls.

“And the pair of shorts that are smalls actually fit great,” he said, grinning. “Who would’ve thought? From triple X to small—it’s kind of crazy.”

I hope you find the article as motivating as I do, for I was this guy, and aim at having a journey similar to him. Do tell me how you feel about the article in the comments below.

Regards,

The Travellothoner.

Who says you can’t? You do!

Whether you’re a bodybuilder, a professional athlete , or an everyday man or woman- there are a handful of general fitness standards. For example, you should be able to deadlift and back squat at least your body weight, run 3k in 20 mins or do 15 complete pushups. I personally keep pushing my limits and levels based on these standards.

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During summers I focus more towards my strength and mobility and running takes a backseat until the weather improves and I am fresh and motivated to pick it up again (You can call it my pre-season training and preparations). Hence, for a while now I have been obsessed with hitting more than my body weight.  With 90 kgs (198 lbs) on the bar, I could fire off 4 clean reps. So a normal thought would be that I could pull off at least a single rep of 100 kgs (220 lbs) easily.

But it wasn’t. If I loaded 100 on the bar, I could barely budge it. I just thought 100 was too much for me for the time being, and I needed to train more to get there. However, this continued for about a couple of weeks. I would look strong working up to my goal, but the 100-kg bar would cause me to flatline. That’s when it became abundantly clear to me that it wasn’t my strength that was holding me back, but my mind. I believed that pulling 100 kgs was going to be one of the hardest things he’d ever do, and so it was.

Fitness Starts In Your Mind

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I started researching about this. Reading articles on bodybuilding.com and talking to other professional lifters. That is when I came across an article that talked about how you set psychological blocks for yourself and how it is that mental aspect that limits your physical potential.

My fix for was easy: One day, I asked my trainer to get me through the deadlift. We were using bumper plates, and throughout the lifting session I asked my trainer to keep mixing and matching and adding and removing plates each set. Eventually, I lost track of how much weight was on the bar.

Without knowing it, I casually pulled 105kgs from the ground with perfect form, but I did not believe it when my trainer told me I’d easily blown through my goal. I made him recount the weight twice.

I told you that to tell you this: Fitness starts in your mind.

If you say something is going to be hard, it will be hard. If you say you can’t do something, you won’t do it.

During my first full marathon, it took me 6:35 hours to get done. It was filled with cramps and blisters. What got me through was the fact that I was not going to give up! Even during my Ladakh Marathon, what kept me going more than anything was the fact that I had decided mentally, that I would finish it.

Since then I’ve seen these kinds of self-limiting beliefs hold back the strength of everyone from average guys to the professional athletes that i come across. These beliefs even held me back. I run marathons, and it wasn’t until I got rid of my self-limiting beliefs that I started hitting PBs (Personal Best Timings).

Unfortunately, the solution isn’t as easy as simply trying to think more positively. One should read the book “Who says you can’t? You Do” byDaniel Chidiac. Although its about one’s psychological and emotional journey, it has a lot of lessons and is certain to unlock our truest potential. Here are my two favourite mental hardening techniques, that I’ve drawn for myself.

Think YES Thoughts

When it comes to performance, we have two types of thoughts: “Yes” thoughts and “No” thoughts.

“No” thoughts are inherently negative thoughts. They set you up to fail. For example, “This will be hard,” “I’m not strong enough,” “I’ll probably fail.” These are the thoughts I had before I got tricked into pulling my deadlift max, and the ones I had before the marathons that I underperformed in.

“Yes” thoughts, on the other hand, are positive thoughts, which breed success. They sound like this: “I’m going to crush this,” “I belong here,” “I am capable of this,” and “Nobody works harder than I do.”

The more NO thoughts you think, the more likely you are to develop a negative self-image—and the more likely you are to fail. The more YES thoughts you think, the more likely you are to succeed.

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Everyone has a balance of the two. No one is immune to self-doubt, but you need to learn to shift your thinking to tip the balance in favour of Yes thoughts.

This is a technique I read online that will help you breed yes thoughts. Here’s how: Place little green stickers over things you see on a daily basis, like your car’s steering wheel, the bathroom mirror, the inside of your fridge, or simply on the weight rack. Every time you see a green dot, tell yourself one reason you’re going to succeed and reach your goal.

This constant repetition of positive thoughts shifts your thinking, reinforces your confidence, and improves your output, essentially overriding your brain’s performance-crushing negativity.

Visualize Successstealandsharefeb14

Visualization was used heavily by Soviet sports scientists in the 1970s, and it’s something a large number of professional athletes and businessmen at the top of their game use today. There is a reason we call every inventor, revolutionary or path-breaker “A Visionary”.

The main principle of visualization is simple: You take time each day to psychologically rehearse what you want to accomplish, like you’re an actor in a movie playing in your mind.

Let’s say your goal is to deadlift two times your body weight. Mentally picture and rehearse exactly what you need to do to accomplish that. See yourself loading the plates, chalking up, spotting up to the bar, and then taking in air as you hinge back and grab the cold steel barbell.

Imagine how all of your muscles feel as you rip the weight from the ground and lock out.

The more details you incorporate, the more effective visualization is.

Scientists believe visualization works by altering processes in your brain like motor control, attention, perception, planning, and memory, while also enhancing your motivation and confidence so that, when it comes time to perform, your brain is “trained” for the actual performance and success.

For visualization to work, however, you need to take it seriously and be fully committed. Every day, you should sit somewhere quiet and close your eyes. Free yourself of all other extraneous thoughts. Take deep breaths and simply think about exactly what you’ll need to do to reach your goal—visualize your surroundings and engage all of your senses as you see the performance play out.

If you think this sounds weird, ask yourself a question: Could it hurt?

Legendary athletes Muhammad Ali, Jack Nicklaus, and Kobe Bryant have all used this technique with great success, and science confirms that visualization has tangible performance enhancing benefits.

The best part is, this practice applies in all walks of life; for EVERY aspect of your life.

It’s the little things that make the difference between winners and losers. And the little things start in your mind, and lead to success.

Until Next Time,

The Travellothoner.

What To Eat And Drink Before A Run

What you eat before, during, and after you run can make or break your training. Eat too little and you’ll bonk—that is, run out of energy to finish your run. Eat too much and you’ll find yourself running to the bathroom. Mid-run fuel—sports drinks, gels, gummy bears, etc.—helps you sustain energy to finish the effort.

BEFORE YOU RUN:

For energy, you need to eat something before any run lasting more than 60 minutes. Ideally, you should have a high-carb, low-fiber meal three to four hours before you plan to run. That period gives your body a chance to fully digest, and it reduces risk of mid-run stomach issues. However, if you’re running in the morning, it’s not always possible to leave that much time between your meal and your run. If you have at least an hour before your workout, eat about 50 grams of carbs (that’s equal to one Banana, 4/5 dates with 4/6 Almonds ).

For Long RUN, consider adding in a little protein, which will help sustain your energy levels.

(Pea-Nuts and Jaggery or 2 eggs is good option)

DURING YOUR RUN:

Taking in fuel—in the form of mostly carbohydrates—during training runs that exceed 60 minutes will help keep your blood sugar even and your energy levels high. Runners should consume about 30 to 60 grams of carbs per hour of exercise, and it’s best to spread that out over time intervals that work for you, such as every 20 minutes. You can get the right amount of carbs from a sports drinks (16 ounces Energy drinks or Dates, for example),

Real foods, like a quarter cup of raisins or two tablespoons of honey, also provide the right amount of easily digested carbs that will energize your run. Everyone’s tolerance for fuel is different, however, so the key is to find out what works for you during your training so you know what to take in on race day.

AFTER YOUR RUN:

Eating a mix of carbs and protein within 30 to 60 minutes post-run is crucial because it helps speed your body’s recovery. Carbs help restock spent glycogen (or energy) stores, while protein helps repair microscopic damage to muscle tissue. If you ran easy for less than 60 minutes, plan to have a small snack (like Idli/Upma/Poha) or whatever your next meal is, such as eating a breakfast of oatmeal with raisins, nuts, and a splash of milk after a morning run. If you ran hard or for longer than 60 minutes, you need something more substantial.

WHAT TO DRINK:

You need to drink enough before, during, and after your run to perform your best. Indeed, just 2 percent dehydration can slow you down. It’s especially important to stay on top of hydration during warm summer months, when you sweat more. While some experts recommend you stay hydrated by simply drinking when thirsty, others suggest you develop a customized plan by performing a sweat test—that is.

weighing yourself before and after exercise:

Any weight loss corresponds with fluid loss, so try to drink enough to replenish that weight. Before you run, you should have six to eight ounces of water, sports drink, or even coffee. While you are running, you should aim to take in three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. Water is usually fine for runs in the 30- to 60-minute range. After runs longer than that, and you should consider a sports drink with carbs and electrolytes to replenish sodium.